Second Isaiah
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Second Isaiah introduction, translation, and notes by

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Published by Doubleday in Garden City, N.Y .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Bible. -- O.T. -- Isaiah XL-LXVI -- Commentaries.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Statementby John L. McKenzie.
SeriesAnchor Bible -- v. 20., Bible -- v. 20.
ContributionsMcKenzie, John L.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBS192.2.A1 1964 .G3 vol. 20
The Physical Object
Paginationlxxiv, 225 p. ;
Number of Pages225
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20670962M

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With its focus on the events surrounding the fall of Babylon to the forces of Cyrus of Persia, Second Isiah is a prophetic book of immense and exultant belief in the renascence of Israel, as the prophet foresees a new age after the long exile.4/5(3). With its focus on the events surrounding the fall of Babylon to the forces of Cyrus of Persia, Second Isiah is a prophetic book of immense and exultant belief in the renascence of Israel, as the prophet foresees a new age after the long exile.5/5(2). Deutero-Isaiah, also called Second Isaiah, section of the Old Testament Book of Isaiah (chapters 40–55) that is later in origin than the preceding chapters, though not . Second Isaiah () probably dates to the Babylonian exile (ca b.c.e.). The prophet brings a message of consolation: Comfort, O comfort my people, says your God.

  This theory of “Deutero-Isaiah” (or second Isaiah) came about near the end of the eighteenth century. Supposedly, Isaiah himself wrote only the first 39 chapters, leaving one of his students to write the second part (chapters 40–66) sometime after . Isaiah is divided into 66 chapters, paralleling the division of the entire Bible into 66 books. The first 39 chapters of Isaiah contain strong themes of God's judgment, resembling the 39 Old Testament books. While the last 27 chapters of Isaiah focus on comfort and the coming of the Messiah, bearing a likeness to the themes of the 27 New. Second, some of the chapters of Isaiah in the Book of Mormon are considered by scholars to have been written not by Isaiah but by other prophets who wrote after the time Lehi left Jerusalem. Some critical writers have attempted to exploit these two issues, but neither can bring the Book of Mormon’s authenticity into question. Chapters 40–55 in the Book of Isaiah are believed to be the work of a prophet who lived with the Hebrew exiles during the Babylonian captivity. Because this prophet's real name is unknown and his work has been preserved in the collection of writings that include the prophecies of the earlier Isaiah, he is usually designated as Deutero-Isaiah — the second Isaiah.

Isaiah is the most quoted prophet in the New Testament, and the Book of Isaiah is second only to Psalms in the number of verse quotations from Hebrew Scripture found in the New Testament. For example, the Gospel of Matthew refers to Isaiah and Matthew to Isaiah , the first Servant song. The book of Isaiah is Narrative History, Prophetic Oracle, and even a Parable (chapter 5). The prophet Isaiah wrote it at approximately B.C. (Chapters , written later in his life approx. B.C.). Isaiah is the first book in the section called Major Prophets. They are called Major Prophets because of the large amount of material they. The great prophet whose oracles, sayings, and poems are found in chapters of the Book of Isaiah, and perhaps elsewhere in the book (e.g., chap. 61), is usually called the Second Isaiah because of his place in the Isaiah scroll.   Second, people believe that Isaiah spoke about the coming Messiah and thus, to deny that Isaiah was the author of the book is to deny the inspiration of the Bible. Christians who believe in the inerrancy of the Bible believe that, if the Bible says Isaiah wrote the book, then to deny that Isaiah wrote his book is to deny the inerrancy of the Bible.